Saturday, November 20, 2010

The Thanksgiving dress is ready for some turkey!  Having finished the bodice on Thursday, I was ready to work on the skirt and the sleeves.

First up, I sewed the back center and the side seams of the skirt.  Then I selected the closest match I had on hand from my stash of vintage hem tape.  I sewed that on.

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Having completed the skirt, there was no putting it off any longer - I had to go to sleeve town.  I set my stitch length to the longest stitch, and basted twice across the top.  This makes the fabric curve and resemble a sleeve. (I swear I am not drinking at 9:00 a.m!  The glass is from yesterday.)

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I did the same to the other sleeve, and then sewed the underam seams.

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It's very important to press seams open.  It keeps your garment from looking homemade, and can smooth out minor imperfections or puckers.  If I learned one thing from the sewing portion of Home Ec class, it's "steam is your friend".  I use the Euro-Pro Shark Steam Iron.  I also burn my fingers a lot and I'm sporting a nasty burn on my forearm that looks sort of like a worm.  You have to respect the steam.

My completed sleeve is ready to attach to my dress.

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It's important to match up the seams on the underarm, and then you just pull up the basting stitch threads to fit, and pin into place.

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I got a pucker on the front of the dress that was impervious to steam. I ripped out a little section and re-stitched.

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My sleeves are attached!

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Finally, I finish my waistband with some double-fold bias tape, and put in my zipper.

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You'll have to wait until Thursday to see the dress on me!  I'm feeling (and probably looking) a little sick today and wasn't in the mood to model.

Next up, I'll show you how I ruined, and then fixed, a very important vintage dress.  Vintage purists, look away!

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